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Questions for the Audit Committee to ask the External Auditors in early 2014

February 15, 2014 Leave a comment Go to comments

The Audit Committee of the Board (or equivalent) is responsible for oversight of the external auditors’ work. This should include taking reasonable measures to ensure a quality audit on which the board and stakeholders can place reliance. As a second priority, it should also include ensuring that the audit work is efficient and does not result in unnecessary disruption or cost to the business.

Audit Committees around the world should be concerned by the findings of the regulators who audit the firms in the US (the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB). They examine a sample of the audits by the firms of public companies’ financial statements and system of internal control over financial reporting. A report is published for each firm and an overall report is also published every few years.

In their October 24, 2013 Staff Alert, the PCAOB highlighted “deficiencies [they] observed in audits of internal control over financial reporting”. They reported that “firms failed to obtain sufficient audit evidence to support their opinions on the effectiveness of internal control due to one or more deficiencies”. In addition, in a large majority of the audits where there were such deficiencies, “the firm also failed to obtain sufficient appropriate evidence to support its opinion on the financial statements”.

While the Staff Alert is intended to help the firms understand and correct deficiencies, it also calls for action by the Audit Committee of each registrant:

“Audit committees of public companies for which audits of internal control are conducted may want to take note of this alert. Audit committees may want to discuss with their auditor the level of auditing deficiencies in this area identified in their auditor’s internal inspections and PCAOB inspections, request information from their auditor about potential root causes, and inquire how their auditor is responding to these matters.”

In a related matter, COSO released an update last year to its venerable Internal Control – Integrated Framework. It includes a discussion of 17 Principles and related Points of Focus. Reportedly, the audit firms and consultants are developing checklists that require management to demonstrate, with suitable evidence, that all the Principles (and in some cases the Points of Focus) are present and functioning. This ignores the fact that COSO has publicly stated that their framework remains risk-based and they never intended nor desired that anybody make a checklist out of the Principles.

Of note is the fact that the PCAOB and SEC have not changed their auditing standards and guidance. They continue, as emphasized in the PCAOB Staff Alert, to require a risk-based and top-down approach to the assessment of internal control over financial reporting.

However, the checklist approach does not consider whether a failure to have any of these Principles or Points of Focus present and functioning represents a risk to the financial statements that would be material.

In other words, blind completion of the checklist is contrary to PCAOB and SEC guidance that the assessment be risk-based and top-down.

With that in mind, I suggest the members of the Audit Committee consider asking their lead audit partner these seven questions at their next meeting. An early discussion is essential if a quality audit is to be performed without unnecessary work and expense to the company.

1. Was your audit of our company’s financial statements and system of internal control reviewed by the PCAOB? If so:

  • For which year was it reviewed?
  • Did the Examiners report anything they considered a deficiency?
    • How significant did they believe it was?
    • Do you agree with their assessment? If not, why not?
    • What actions have been taken to correct that deficiency?
    • What actions will you take to ensure it or similar deficiencies do not recur, including additional training of the staff?
    • Has any disciplinary action been considered?
  • If you did not promptly report this to us, why not?

2. Were any of the partners and managers part of the audit team on a client where the PCAOB Examiners reviewed and had issues with the quality of the audit? If so:

  • What was the nature of any deficiency?
  • How significant did the Examiners consider it to be?
  • What actions have you taken and will continue to take to ensure it and similar deficiencies do not occur on our audit, including additional staff training?

3. Are there any members of your audit team who have been counseled formally or otherwise relating to quality issues identified either by the PCAOB or other quality assurance processes? What assurance can you provide us that you will perform a quality audit without additional cost to us for enhanced supervision and quality control?

4. With respect to the audit of internal control over financial reporting, have you coordinated with management to ensure optimal efficiency, including:

  • A shared assessment of the financial reporting risks, significant accounts and locations, etc., to include in the scope of work for the SOX assessment? In other words, have you ensured you have identified the same financial reporting risks as management?
  • The opportunity to place reliance on management testing? Have you discussed and explained why if you are placing less than maximum reliance on management testing in low or medium risk areas?
  • The processes for sharing the results of testing, changes in the system of internal control, and other information important to both your and management’s assessment?

5. Are you taking a top-down and risk-based approach to the assessment of internal control over financial reporting?

6. Does the top-down and risk-based approach include your processes for assessing whether the COSO Principles are present and functioning? Do your processes ensure that neither in your own work nor in your requirements of management addressing areas relating to the Principles and their Points of Focus where a failure would present less than a reasonable possibility of a material misstatement of the financial statements filed with the SEC? Have you limited your own audit work to areas where there is at least a reasonable possibility that a failure would represent at least a reasonable possibility of a material error – directly or through their effect on other controls relied upon to either prevent or detect such errors? Or have you developed and are using a checklist contrary to the requirements of Auditing Standard No. 5, instead of taking a risk-based approach?

7. How do you ensure continuous improvement in the quality and efficiency of your audit work?

I welcome your comments.

  1. Daniel Rueda
    February 18, 2014 at 9:58 AM

    Very interestig and valuable article. Mark, I am always curious why the external auditor have access to all of the internal auditor work and yet, the internal auditor cannot have access to the external auditor workpaper. Is there a legal or contractual clause which prevent the internal auditor or audit committee from having access to the external auditor workpapers?

    Thanks

    Dan Rueda
    Internal Auditor

  2. Norman Marks
    February 18, 2014 at 10:07 AM

    Dan, the external auditor has access to all information and records of the company, including the internal auditors working papers – unless there is a clear reason why not, such as records pertaining to an investigation. The records of the external auditor are their own property and the company has no rights to them.

    I hope that helps.

    • Daniel Rueda
      February 18, 2014 at 10:14 AM

      Thank you for your quick response. Is that stated in the engagement letter? Could you direct me to the specific part of the contract that would include the right of the external auditor not to disclose their workpapers? Is that law on a federal level, state or even universal.

      Thanks again!
      Dan

  3. Norman Marks
    February 18, 2014 at 11:14 AM

    Dan, you might have a look at your company’s engagement letter. Here is the relevant standard: http://pcaobus.org/Standards/Auditing/Pages/AU339A.aspx

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