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Leading the 21st century organization

October 6, 2014 1 comment

I have been a fan of Tom Peters (author of “In Search of Excellence” and many more books) for more than 20 years.

While CAE at Tosco Corporation, I attended a presentation by him on something he called Wow! The concept, which I not only wrote about for the Internal Auditor magazine in 2001 but tried to incorporate into my internal audit practice, is to turn every project into something that you would tell your grandchildren about (Wow! indeed).

Tom is now 71 but hasn’t slowed down. He is amazingly actively presenting all over the world, writing books, and on Twitter (where we interact from time to time).

Recently, he was interviewed by McKinsey and I recommend reading the full piece. Here are some excerpts.

“My real bottom-line hypothesis is that nobody has a sweet clue what they’re doing. Therefore you better be trying stuff at an insanely rapid pace. You want to be screwing around with nearly everything. Relentless experimentation was probably important in the 1970s—now it’s do or die.”

“…the secret to success is daydreaming.”

“If you take a leadership job, you do people. Period. It’s what you do. It’s what you’re paid to do. People, period. Should you have a great strategy? Yes, you should. How do you get a great strategy? By finding the world’s greatest strategist, not by being the world’s greatest strategist. You do people.”

“We’re in the big-change business, aren’t we? Isn’t that the whole point? I mean, any idiot with a high IQ can invent a great strategy. What’s really hard is fighting against the unwashed masses and pulling it off—although there’s nothing stupider than saying change is about overcoming resistance. Change is about recruiting allies and working each other up to have the nerve to try the next experiment. You find allies. You encircle the buggers.”

“I’m more than willing to say that today’s two year old is going to deal with his or her fellow human beings differently than you or I do. But the reality is it’s 2014, not 2034, and I would argue that for the next 20 years, we’re still safe believing in the importance of face-to-face contact. I’m not arguing against virtual meetings, but I’m telling you that if I’m running IBM, I want to be on the road 200 days a year as much in 2014 as in 2004 or in 1974. It has nothing to do with the value of the tools, but I’ve got to see you face to face now and then; I don’t think I can do it all screen to screen.”

“At some deep level, people are people, and so I believe passionately that there is no difference between leading now and leading then. What I certainly believe is that anybody who is leading a sizable institution who doesn’t do what I did and take a year off and read or what have you, and who doesn’t embrace the new technology with youthful joy and glee, is out of business.”

This last is 100% consistent with the quote from another McKinsey Quarterly issue I used in Management for the Next 50 Years:

“Those who understand the depth, breadth, and radical nature of the change and opportunity that’s on the way will be best able to reset their intuitions accordingly, shape this new world, and thrive.”

Do you agree?

Management for the next 50 years

October 3, 2014 3 comments

An article in McKinsey’s Quarterly Journal that I strongly recommend is on the topic of Management intuition for the next 50 years. My only quibble is that title implies that there is time to act; I believe organizations that prepare now for the changes described in the article will thrive immediately and their competitive advantage grow in the next decade let alone 50 years.

I recommend a careful read of the entire piece. Here are some key excerpts to whet your appetite (emphasis added):

“We stand today on the precipice of much bigger shifts…., with extraordinary implications for global leaders. In the years ahead, acceleration in the scope, scale, and economic impact of technology will usher in a new age of artificial intelligence, consumer gadgetry, instant communication, and boundless information while shaking up business in unimaginable ways. At the same time, the shifting locus of economic activity and dynamism, to emerging markets and to cities within those markets, will give rise to a new class of global competitors. Growth in emerging markets will occur in tandem with the rapid aging of the world’s population—first in the West and later in the emerging markets themselves—that in turn will create a massive set of economic strains.”

Any one of these shifts, on its own, would be among the largest economic forces the global economy has ever seen. As they collide, they will produce change so significant that much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant. The formative experiences for many of today’s senior executives came as these forces were starting to gain steam. The world ahead will be less benign, with more discontinuity and volatility and with long-term charts no longer looking like smooth upward curves, long-held assumptions giving way, and seemingly powerful business models becoming upended.”

The article discusses three key trends while acknowledging that there are many more:

  • Dynamism in emerging markets
  • Technology and connectivity
  • Aging populations

This is what it says about technology and connectivity:

“As information flows continue to grow, and new waves of disruptive technology emerge, the old mind-set that technology is primarily a tool for cutting costs and boosting productivity will be replaced. Our new intuition must recognize that businesses can start and gain scale with stunning speed while using little capital, that value is shifting between sectors, that entrepreneurs and start-ups often have new advantages over large established businesses, that the life cycle of companies is shortening, and that decision making has never had to be so rapid fire.”

I think this is very well said! They go on to say:

Emerging on the winning side in this increasingly volatile world will depend on how fully leaders recognize the magnitude—and the permanence—of the coming changes and how quickly they alter long-established intuitions.”

“It will be increasingly difficult for senior leaders to establish or implement effective strategies unless they remake themselves in the image of the technologically advanced, demographically complex, geographically diverse world in which we will all be operating.”

Technology is no longer simply a budget line or operational issue—it is an enabler of virtually every strategy. Executives need to think about how specific technologies are likely to affect every part of the business and be completely fluent about how to use data and technology…… Technological opportunities abound, but so do threats, including cybersecurity risks, which will become the concern of a broader group of executives as digitization touches every aspect of corporate life.”

“New priorities in this environment include ensuring that companies are using machine intelligence in innovative ways to change and reinvent work, building the next-generation skills they need to drive the future’s tech-led business models, and upskilling and retraining workers whose day-to-day activities are amenable to automation but whose institutional knowledge is valuable.”

McKinsey closes with a reiteration of the problem that is also an opportunity for those prepared to take the risk and embrace the need for change:

“Those who understand the depth, breadth, and radical nature of the change and opportunity that’s on the way will be best able to reset their intuitions accordingly, shape this new world, and thrive.”

I welcome your comments.

Guidance for Directors on Disruptive Change

July 7, 2014 3 comments

Every organization needs to be able to not only anticipate and address the inevitability of change that might disrupt its business, but be prepared to take advantage of the opportunities that will present themselves.

We talk about risk as if every uncertainty has a downside.

We talk about opportunity as if it is something that we choose to seize or not, and do little to ensure we identify and take full advantage. How do we expect to optimize our performance when we are cavalier about moving quickly to take advantage of opportunities that may rise and disappear quickly?

We talk about resilience as if we should stand tall, like a wall, in the face of disruptive change. Perhaps we should move, either out of the way or to align ourselves to benefit from the movement (think Aikidao).

In fact, all of these come into play. Situations and events can have multiple possible effects, some good and some bad, and are not limited to one outcome at a time. As a simple example, the loss of one employee is the opportunity to hire somebody with different skills, reorganize the function, and so on.

What distinguishes our times from years past is the pace of change.

Deloitte recently published Directors’ Alert 2014: Greater oversight, deeper insight: Boardroom strategies in an era of disruptive change. Here are some excerpts:

“Sometimes, changes occur that are more dramatic. In the past, disruptive changes usually happened only periodically and resulted in a sustained plateau – the automated assembly line, for example, which revolutionized industry in the early twentieth century, continues to be a central feature of modern manufacturing. Today, however, disruptive change has become a perpetual occurrence in which one change instantly sparks a chain of others. What’s more, these changes are being generated by a variety of factors – digital disruption created by continuing technological advances, regulatory reforms, economic turmoil, globalization, and shifting social norms and perceptions.”

“In this environment, everything and anything may change at any time as category boundaries are blurred, supply chains are disrupted, and long-standing business models become obsolete. With change, however, comes opportunity. Technological advances enable organizations to generate new revenues by targeting new customers, new sectors, and access new geographies while more fully automating back office activities and divesting of declining assets to reduce costs. The challenge for organizations is to recognize when disruptive change is occurring and to act quickly and decisively when it does.”

“In this environment of ongoing, tumultuous change, organizations and their management and boards of directors must respond quickly and adeptly if they are to effectively address all the disruptive changes that surround and affect them. For boards of directors, this often requires greater oversight – expanding their scope to include activities and areas that were not traditionally part of their mandate. At the same time, boards must ensure that management provides them with deeper insights into the organization’s activities so directors can clearly understand all of the potential opportunities and risks.”

Deloitte takes each area of major change (such as strategy, technology, taxation, regulatory compliance and so on) and includes questions for directors to use in discussions with management.

I am working with ISACA on guidance for directors and executives on how disruptive technology might affect corporate strategy. I came up with a few questions of my own that directors and top executives might use:

  1. How does the organization identify the new or maturing technologies that might be of value and merit consideration in setting or adjusting strategies, objectives, and plans?
  2. Who is responsible for the assessment process?
  3. Who determines whether existing strategies, objectives, or plans should be adjusted?
  4. Does the assessment consider the potential for value to be created in multiple areas of the organization, or does each functional area act on its own?
  5. Does the assessment consider, with inclusion in the process of related experts, potential compliance and other risks?
  6. Does the assessment consider the potential actions of competitors, suppliers, customers, and regulators?
  7. Does the board discuss the potential represented by new or maturing technology on a regular basis and as part of its discussions of enterprise strategy?

Do you think these are the right questions? How would your organization fare?

I welcome your comments.

Risk Officers on the Front Lines of the Big Data Analytics Revolution

March 8, 2014 4 comments

I was intrigued to read that when McKinsey gathered together “eight executives from companies that are leaders in data analytics …. to share perspectives on their biggest challenges”, they included not only chief information officers and marketing executives, but the chief risk officer from American Express.

The McKinsey Quarterly report that reviews the discussion doesn’t have any ground-breaking revelations. They say what has been said before, although it is still important for all of us to understand the enormous potential of Big Data Analytics.

One key point is that the existence of Big Data by itself has very limited value. It’s the ability to use emerging technology (from companies like SAP, Oracle, and IBM) to not only mine the data but deliver insights at blinding speed (using in-memory technology) that will bring amazing results.

But I was looking for more, which I explain after these quotes.

Big-data analytics are delivering an economic impact in the organization… The reality of where and how data analytics can improve performance varies dramatically by company and industry.

Companies need to operate along two horizons: capturing quick wins to build momentum while keeping sight of longer-term, ground-breaking applications. Although, as one executive noted, “We carefully measure our near-term impact and generate internal ‘buzz’ around these results,” there was also a strong belief in the room that the journey crosses several horizons. “We are just seeing the tip of the iceberg,” said one participant. Many believed that the real prize lies in reimagining existing businesses or launching entirely new ones based on the data companies possess.

New opportunities will continue to open up. For example, there was a growing awareness, among participants, of the potential of tapping swelling reservoirs of external data—sometimes known as open data—and combining them with existing proprietary data to improve models and business outcomes.

Privacy has become the third rail in the public discussion of big data, as media accounts have rightly pointed out excesses in some data-gathering methods. Little wonder that consumer wariness has risen.

Our panelists presume that in the data-collection arena, the motives of companies are good and organizations will act responsibly. But they must earn this trust continually; recovering from a single privacy breach or misjudgment could take years. Installing internal practices that reinforce good data stewardship, while also communicating the benefits of data analytics to customers, is of paramount importance. In the words of one participant: “Consumers will trust companies that are true to their value proposition. If we focus on delivering that, consumers will be delighted. If we stray, we’re in problem territory.”

To catalyze analytics efforts, nearly every company was using a center of excellence, which works with businesses to develop and deploy analytics rapidly. Most often, it includes data scientists, business specialists, and tool developers. Companies are establishing these centers in part because business leaders need the help. Centers of excellence also boost the organization-wide impact of the scarce translator talent described above. They can even help attract and retain talent: at their best, centers are hotbeds of learning and innovation as teams share ideas on how to construct robust data sets, build powerful models, and translate them into valuable business tools.

What I was disappointed in was a lack of reference to how Big Data Analytics could and should be a fantastic opportunity for risk officers and internal audit executives.

All practitioners should be familiar with the concept of Key Risk Indicators (KRI). A useful paper by COSO defines KRI:

“Key risk indicators are metrics used by organizations to provide an early signal of increasing [ndm: they should have said ‘changing’] risk exposures in various areas of the enterprise. In some instances, they may represent key ratios that management throughout the organization track as indicators of evolving risks, and potential opportunities, which signal the need for actions that need to be taken. Others may be more elaborate and involve the aggregation of several individual risk indicators into a multi-dimensional score about emerging events that may lead to new risks or opportunities.”

Some vendors (including MetricStream, IBM, and SAP) are showing us the way in which Big Data Analytics can be used to produce KRIs that are more powerful and insightful than ever before.

However, I am not convinced that practitioners are seizing the opportunity.

I fear that they are concerned about the risks as their organizations embrace Big Data Analytics to drive performance while remaining blind to the opportunity to develop KRIs so that business executives can take the right risks.

I would appreciate your views. Is it a matter of cost? Or are happy simply unaware of the potential?

ISACA releases white paper on Big Data

January 31, 2014 1 comment

ISACA has just released a new paper on Big Data that I like and recommend. (Full disclosure: I reviewed and provided feedback on a draft and I am quoted in the press release).

What I like the most is the title: “It May Be Riskier to Ignore Big Data Than Implement It”. It captures my belief that the value that can be obtained by the intelligent and creative use of analytics against the massive data sets that are available to every organization far outweighs both the cost of the effort and any associated risk.

Most organizations recognize that there is value, although in practice that value is usually limited by their ability to define the critical business questions that can be answered by the use of the wonderful new tools available today against Big Data.

They are also limited by their belief that they are constrained by inadequacies in their corporate systems.

My view is that almost any organization, no matter what size or type it is, not only can but should be taking advantage of the immense possibilities. Not to do so indicates that they lack both imagination and resolve.

Internal auditors, information security practitioners, risk professionals, and executives should be blinded to the great values and possibilities by the risks of moving forward.

Here are a few excerpts from the paper:

“New analytics tools and methods are expanding the possibilities for how enterprises can derive value from existing data within their organizations and from freely available external information sources, such as software as a service (SaaS), social media and commercial data sources. While traditional business intelligence has generally targeted “structured data” that can be easily parsed and analyzed, advances in analytics methods now allow examination of more varied data types.”

“Information security, audit and governance professionals should take a holistic approach and understand the business case of big data analytics and the potential technical risk when evaluating the use and deployment of big data analytics in their organizations.”

“For information security, audit and governance professionals, lack of clarity about the business case may stifle organizational success and lead to role and responsibility confusion.”

“By looking at how these analytics techniques are transforming enterprises in real-world scenarios, the value becomes apparent as enterprises start to realize dramatic gains in the efficiency, efficacy and performance of mission-critical business processes.”

“Understanding this business case can help security, audit and governance practitioners in two ways: It helps them to understand the motivation and rationale driving their business partners who want to apply big data analytics techniques within their enterprises, and it helps balance the risk equation so that technical risk and business risk are addressed. Specifically, while some new areas of technical risk may arise as a result of more voluminous and concentrated data, the business consequences of not adopting big data analytics may outweigh the technology risk.”

My friends and former colleagues at SAP have chimed in with an emphasis on the increased value when more sophisticated tools, especially ‘predictive analytics”, are used to mine and produce information from Big Data.

The SAP paper on this topic, “Predicting the future of Predictive Analytics” makes the point well. Here are some wise thoughts from James Fisher, an SAP executive, that focus on the risk of using analytics and Big Data without making sure that the information you are using to run the business is reliable:

“The opportunity of big data is huge, and the biggest analytical opportunity I see within that is the use of predictive analytics. The data shows companies favor taking advantage of the opportunities in front of then rather than minimizing risk.  Technology is playing a role here and making predictive capabilities even easier to use, embedding them in business processes, automating model creation. SAP is of course in a position to deliver all this.  The added question however to ask (and this is really my view) is that this does introduce an inherent risk that people don’t know what they are looking at and blinding follow what the data says…. When you read a weather forecast you immediately sanity check what it says by looking out the window, is everyone doing the same with data?”

You can read more from James on his blog.

My question to you is this:

Are you so risk averse when it comes to the use of analytics and Big Data that you are a barrier to the success of the organization?

Digital Transformation

December 14, 2013 10 comments

I thoroughly enjoyed listening to an MIT Sloan video, “What Digital Transformation Means for Business”. It features executives from Intel, Avis (the president of Zipcar), a researcher into the topic from MIT, and a Capgemini consultant.

It’s about 45 minutes long, so allow yourself some quiet time and have a pad and pencil (or tablet) handy so you can take notes.

I found it inspiring to hear these influential leaders talk about the need for organizations to embrace disruptive technology (they mentioned cloud computing, ultramobile, advanced big data analytics, and social media).

They also emphasized that the risk of NOT embracing the technology of tomorrow, even when they are in the process of implementing the technology of today, is too great. It is critical to continue to watch and consider how the technology that appears on the horizon may affect the ability of the organization to excel.

I loved the story told by the Intel CIO of how she assigns her staff to work within the business to learn it, and then takes them back into IT so they can work on enhancing that business.

You should also listen to how Intel uses gamification to have a better handle on earnings forecasts. It was a great example of how gamification can be used as a technique for understanding and assessing risk. I have written separately about how an organization assessed risks to the success of a major software implementation by creating a stock market game around it. Individuals on the project team from IT and user departments, the consultants they engaged, and others with a stake in its success bought and sold fictional stock in the project. The stock price varied based on demand: when there was optimism, people bought stock and the price rose; when there was pessimism, people sold and the price dropped. The risk assessment considered the stock price and tried to understand why it moved.

Intel and Avis, together with Capgemini, talked about how much time executives were spending on digital transformation. Clearly, these companies (and I join them) expect leaders from the CEO on down to be spending a good amount of time looking at and considering the technology of today and tomorrow and how it can transform their business.

What do you think?

You might also consider this discussion on the battle between IT and the business for control over technology resources.

I close with my greetings to all for a healthy, prosperous, and joyous holiday season and new year.