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Cyber and reputation risk are dominoes

February 18, 2017 12 comments

Anthony Fitzsimmons recently sent me a review copy of his new book, Rethinking Reputation Risk. He says that it “Provides a new perspective on the true nature of reputational risk and damage to organizations and traces its root causes in individual and collective human behavior”.

I am not sure that there is much that is new in the book, but if you want to understand how human behavior can be the root cause (in fact, it is very often the root cause) of problems for any organization, you may find it of interest.

The authors (Fitsimmons and Professor Derek Atkins) describe several case studies where human failures led to serious issues.

Humans as a root cause is also a topic I cover in World-Class Risk Management.

As I was reading the book, I realized that I have a problem with organizations placing separate attention to reputation risk and its management. It’s simply an element, which should not be overlooked, in how any organization manages risk – or, I should say, how it considers what might happen in its decision-making activities.

The same thing applies to cyber risk and even compliance risk.

They are all dominoes.

dominoes

A case study:

  • There is a possibility that the manager in HR that recruits IT specialists leaves.
  • The position is open for three months before an individual is hired.
  • An open position for an IT specialist who is responsible for patching a number of systems is not filled for three months.
  • A system vulnerability remains open because there is nobody to apply a vendor’s patch.
  • A hacker obtains entry. CYBER RISK
  • The hacker steals personal information on thousands of customers.
  • The information is posted on the Internet.
  • Customers are alarmed. REPUTATION RISK
  • Sales drop.
  • The company fails to meet analyst expectations for earnings.
  • The price for the company’s shares drop 20%.
  • The CEO decides to slash budgets and headcounts by 10% across the board.
  • Individuals in Quality are laid off.
  • Materials are not thoroughly inspected.
  • Defective materials are used in production.
  • Scrap rates rise, but not all defective products are detected and some are shipped to customers.
  • Customers complain, return products and demand compensation. REPUTATION RISK
  • Sales drop, earnings targets are missed again, and …….
  • At the same time as the Quality staff is downsized, the capital expenditure budget is cut.
  • The Information Security Officer’s request for analytics to detect hackers who breach the company’s defenses is turned down.
  • Multiple breaches are not detected. CYBER RISK
  • Hackers steal the company’s trade secrets.
  • Competitors acquire the trade secrets and are able to erode any edge the company may have.
  • The company’s REPUTATION for a technology edge disappears. REPUTATION RISK
  • Sales drop. Earnings targets are not achieved, and……..

It is true that every domino and the source of risk to its stability (what might happen) needs to be addressed.

But, focusing on one or two dominoes in the chain is unlikely to prevent serious issues.

One decision at a low level in the company can have a domino effect.

Consider this slide deck by ERM Strategies, Inc. about the Deep Water Horizon disaster.

I welcome your comments.

Leading an effective information security capability

September 4, 2016 5 comments

With all the press and concern about cyber at all levels of the organization, with the regulators, and among the public, it is a worthwhile exercise to consider what this should mean for the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) or equivalent.

Some point to the need to elevate the position of CISO to report directly to a senior executive, even to the CEO.

Elevating the position, in my opinion, will not necessarily do more than elevate the voice of cyber in the executive suite. It won’t necessarily drive the resources necessary for an effective cyber program, nor will it necessarily change the minds and attitudes of people from the executives on down.

In fact, elevating the position carries the risk that the CISO will get caught up in organizational politics instead of focusing on cyber risk itself.

Deloitte tackles this and other opportunities in a new piece, The new CISO: Leading the strategic security organization.

Of course, they are using words intended to induce people to read: ‘new’ and ‘strategic’. I think we can easily disregard them and focus on the problem at hand.

First, let’s acknowledge that the role of the CISO (or other individual responsible for information security) should never be considered as simply a compliance function.

Deloitte talks about “the imperative to move beyond the role of compliance monitors and enforcers to integrate better with the business, manage information risks more strategically, and work toward a culture of shared cyber risk ownership across the enterprise”.

But even when I had information security reporting to me 30 years ago, it was about protecting the organization and not just about compliance.

It is foolish to believe that executives or the board will invest if the only return is compliance. Yes, it is necessary but a compliance function will never receive the attention of a function that contributes to the success of the organization. Executives will commit resources to the level they think prudent, but not necessarily what it will take to enable success – because they don’t understand how cyber relates to their personal and corporate success.

If they don’t know that it matters to success, it won’t matter to them.

The successful CISO helps everybody appreciate how cyber contributes to and enables success.

Buried in the Deloitte material are two sections of great importance:

  • While the CISO may think in terms of reducing risks, business leaders take risks every day, whether introducing an existing product to a new market, taking on an external partner to pursue a new line of business, or engaging in a merger or acquisition. In fact, the ability to accept more risk can increase business opportunities, while ruling it out may lead to their loss. From this perspective, the role of the CISO becomes one of helping leadership and employees be aware of and understand cyber risks, and equipping them to make decisions based on that understanding. In some cases, the organization’s innovation agenda may necessitate a more lenient view of security controls.
  • …… CISOs [need] to pivot the conversation—both in terms of their mind-set as well as language—from security and compliance to focus more on risk strategy and management. Going beyond the negative aspect of how much damage or loss can result from risk, CISOs need to understand risk in terms of its potential to positively affect competitive advantage, business growth, and revenue expansion.

These are, in my opinion, the keys to an effective cyber program.

If the CISO is going to influence not only the resources he or she is given but the attitude and actions of the organization, it is necessary not only to understand how the business is run, but to talk to executives in the language of the business.

Talk about how the achievement of objectives may be affected by a cyber breach. Talking about specific objectives is the best way to influence hearts and minds.

Help executives make intelligent decisions when it is appropriate to accept a cyber risk to reap a business reward.

Talk business risk, not technobabble.

Do you agree?

Are there other points of value in the Deloitte paper?

Are you ready for the new technology that will change our world, again?

August 8, 2015 5 comments

It’s not that long since we were dismissing the Internet of Things as something very much ‘next generation’. But, as you will see from Deloitte’s collection of articles (Deloitte Review Issue 17), many organizations are already starting to deploy related technologies. I also like Wired magazine’s older piece.

Have a look at this article in the New York Times that provided some consumer-related examples. Texas Instruments has a web page with a broader view, mentioning building and home automation; smart cities; smart manufacturing; wearables; healthcare; and automotive. Talking of the latter, AT&T is connecting a host of new cars to the Internet through in-auto WiFi.

At the same time, technology referred to as Machine Learning (see this from the founder of Sun Microsystems) will be putting many jobs at risk, including analysis and decision-making (also see this article in The Atlantic). If that is not enough, the IMF has weighed in on the topic with a piece called Toil and Technology.

Is your organization open to the possibilities – the new universe of potential products and services, efficiencies in operations, and insights into the market? Or do you wait and follow the market leader, running the risk of being left in their dust?

Do you have the capabilities to understand and assess the risks as well as the opportunities?

Do your strategic planning and risk management processes allow you to identify, assess and evaluate all the effects of what might be around the corner? Or do you have one group of people assessing potential opportunity and another, totally separate, assessing downside risk?

How can isolated opportunity and downside risk processes get you where you need to go, making intelligent decisions and optimizing outcomes?

When you are looking forward, whether at the horizon or just a few feet in front of you, several situations and events are possible and each has a combination of positive and negative effects.

Intelligent decision-making means understanding all these possibilities and considering them together before making an informed decision. It is not sufficient to simply net off the positive and negative, as (a) they may occur at different times, and (b) their effects may be felt in different ways, such as a potentially positive effect on profits, but a negative potential effect on cash flow and liquidity; the negative effect may be outside acceptable ranges.

With these new technologies disrupting our world, every organization needs to question whether it has the capability to evaluate them and determine how and when to start deploying them.

COSO ERM and ISO 31000 are under review and updates are expected in the next year or so. I hope that they both move towards providing guidance on risk-intelligent and informed decision-making where all the potential effects of uncertainty are considered, rather than guiding us on the silo of risk management.

Are you ready?

I welcome your comments.

 

For more on this and related topics, please consider World-Class Risk Management.

Cyber risk and the boardroom

June 5, 2015 7 comments

The National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) has published a discussion between the leader of PwC’s Center for Board Governance, Mary Ann Cloyd, and an expert on cyber who formally served as a leader of the US Air Force’s cyber operations, Suzanne Vautrinot.

It’s an interesting read on a number of levels; I recommend it for board members, executives, information security professionals and auditors.

Here are some of the points in the discussion worth emphasizing:

“An R&D organization, a manufacturer, a retail company, a financial institution, and a critical utility would likely have different considerations regarding cyber risk. Certainly, some of the solutions and security technology can be the same, but it’s not a cookie-cutter approach. An informed risk assessment and management strategy must be part of the dialogue.”

“When we as board members are dealing with something that requires true core competency expertise—whether it’s mergers and acquisitions or banking and investments or cybersecurity—there are advisors and experts to turn to because it is their core competency. They can facilitate the discussion and provide background information, and enable the board to have a very robust, fulsome conversation about risks and actions.”

“The board needs to be comfortable having the conversation with management and the internal experts. They need to understand how cybersecurity risk affects business decisions and strategy. The board can then have a conversation with management saying, ‘OK, given this kind of risk, what are we willing to accept or do to try to mitigate it? Let’s have a conversation about how we do this currently in our corporation and why.’”

Cloyd: What you just described doesn’t sound unique to cybersecurity. It’s like other business risks that you’re assessing, evaluating, and dealing with. It’s another part of the risk appetite discussion. Vautrinot: Correct. The only thing that’s different is the expertise you bring in, and the conversation you have may involve slightly different technology.”

Cloyd: Cybersecurity is like other risks, so don’t be intimidated by it. Just put on your director hat and oversee this as you do other major risks. Vautrinot: And demand that the answers be provided in a way that you understand. Continue to ask questions until you understand, because sometimes the words or the jargon get in the way.”

“Cybersecurity is a business issue, it’s not just a technology issue.”

This was a fairly long conversation as these things go, but time and other limitations probably affected the discussion – and limited the ability to probe the topic in greater depth.

For example, there are some more points that I would emphasize to boards:

  • It is impossible to eliminate cyber-related risk. The goal should be to understand what the risk is at any point and obtain assurance that management (a) knows what the risk is, (b) considers it as part of decision-making, including its potential effect on new initiatives, (c) has established at what point the risk becomes acceptable, because investing more has diminishing returns, (d) has reason to believe its ability to prevent/detect cyber breaches is at the right level, considering the risk and the cost of additional measures (and is taking corrective actions when it is not at the desired level), (e) has a process to respond promptly and appropriately in the event of a breach, (f) has tested that capability, and (g) has a process in place to communicate to the board the information the board needs, when it needs it, to provide effective oversight.
  • Cyber risk should not be managed separately from enterprise or business risk. Cyber may be only one of several sources of risk to a new initiative, and the total risk to that initiative needs to be understood.
  • Cyber-related risk should be assessed and evaluated based on its effect on the business, not based on some calculated value for the information asset.
  • The board can never have, or maintain, the level of sophisticated knowledge required to assess cyber risk itself. It needs to ask questions and probe management’s responses until it has confidence that management has the ability to address cyber risk.

I welcome your comments and observations on the article and my points, above.

How much cyber risk should you take?

May 24, 2015 6 comments

I have been spending a fair amount of time over the last few months, talking and listening to board members and advisors, including industry experts, about cyber risk.

A number of things are clear:

  • Boards, not just those members who are on the audit and/or risk committee, are concerned about cyber and the risk it represents to their organization. They are concerned because they don’t understand it – and the actions they should take as directors. The level of concern is sufficient for them to attend conferences dedicated to the topic rather than relying on their organization.
  • They are not comfortable with the information they are receiving on cyber risk from management – management’s assessment of the risk that it represents to their organization; the measures management has taken to (a) prevent intrusions, (b) detect intrusions that got past defenses, and (c) respond to such intrusions; how cyber risk is or may be affected by changes in the business, including new business initiatives; and, the current level and trend of intrusion attacks (some form of metrics).
  • The risk should be assessed, evaluated, and addressed, not in isolation as a separate IT or cyber risk, but in terms of its potential effect on the business. Cyber risk should be integrated into enterprise risk management. Not only does it need to be assessed in terms of its potential effect on organizational business objectives, but it is only one of several risks that may affect each business objective.
  • It is impossible to eliminate cyber risk. In fact, it is broadly recognized that it is impossible to have impenetrable defenses (although every reasonable effort should be made to harden them). That mandates increased attention to the timely detection of those who have breached the defenses, as well as the capability to respond at speed.
  • Because it is impossible to eliminate risk, a decision has to be made (by the board and management, with advice and counsel from IT, information security, the risk officer, and internal audit) as to the level of risk that is acceptable. How much will the organization invest in cyber compared to the level of risk and the need for those same resources to be invested in other initiatives? The board members did not like to hear talk of accepting a level of risk, but that is an uncomfortable fact of life – they need to get over and deal with it!

The National Association of Corporate Directors has published a handbook on cyber for directors (free after registration).

Here is a list of questions I believe directors should consider. They should be asked of executive management (not just the CIO or CISO) in a session dedicated to cyber.

  1. How do you identify and assess cyber-related risks?
  2. Is your assessment of cyber-related risks integrated with your enterprise-wide risk management program so you can include all the potential effects on the business (including business disruption, reputation risk, inability to bill customers, loss of IP, compliance risk, and so on) and not just “IT-risk”?
  3. How do you evaluate the risk to know whether it is too high?
  4. How do you decide what actions to take and how much resource to allocate?
  5. How often do you update your cyber risk assessment? Do you have sufficient insight into changes in cyber-related risks?
  6. How do you assess the potential new risks introduced by new technology? How do you determine when to take the risk because of the business value?
  7. Are you satisfied that you have an appropriate level of protection in place to minimize the risk of a successful attack?
  8. How will you know when your defenses have been breached? Will you know fast enough to minimize any loss or damage?
  9. Can you respond appropriately at speed?
  10. What procedures are in place to notify you, and then the board, in the event of a breach?
  11. Who has responsibility for cybersecurity and do they have the access they need to senior management?
  12. Is there an appropriate risk-aware culture within the organization, especially given the potential for any manager to introduce new risks by signing up for new cloud services?

I welcome your thoughts, perspectives, and comments.

Cybersecurity is broken

April 11, 2015 6 comments

At least, that is what one expert has to say in a provocative piece in SC magazine.

Here are some excerpts, but I recommend you read the short article.

The author, the CEO of a software vendor of cybersecurity products, starts with these points:

…user-driven technology has progressed so rapidly that it has significantly outpaced technology’s own ability to keep data protected from misuse and guarded from cyber vulnerabilities…….

A lack of reliable security is the price we’ve paid for this eruption of amazing new cloud-based services and keeping vital data out of the wrong hands is an uphill battle.

He then spells out a truth that we should all acknowledge:

Anyone who tells you that your data is secure today is lying to you. The state-of-the-art that is cybersecurity today is broken. There must be a better way. But don’t lose hope, there is.

The article then takes a new direction (at least for me):

CIOs today need to adopt an entirely new security philosophy – one that hinges on the fact that your files and information will be everywhere……..

If we can build a new security approach from the ground up based on the premise that data will escape, and are then able to secure everything no matter where it is, we end up debunking the concept of the “leak” entirely.

I do agree that the traditional, exclusive, focus on preventing an intrusion cannot continue. He says:

That’s why my biggest frustration coming out of the recent Sony and Anthem hacks is companies opting for reactive solutions to fortify firewalls and secure siloed tunnels of information. For example, there was a major uptick in company-wide email-deletion policies in the wake of the Sony attack. Now that’s just dumb. Those are band-aid strategies that fail to address the heart of the problem.

He continues to press his point:

Maintaining a level of security in a boundaryless world means security and policy follow exactly what you’re trying to protect in the first place — the data……

Usable security, where users can choose how they want to access, store and share data, can only be made possible by providing a seamless user experience, so security is integrated into the daily work of everyone. A great user experience is one major obstacle security vendors (and arguably, all enterprise services) have yet to conquer. If we can do it, we will move away from panic-inducing scare tactics used to encourage adoption, and instead empower users with a solution they actually like to secure data…..

In order to be a security company, enterprises need to rethink a few things. First, users have to be in control of their data at any given point in time and should be able to revoke access when they want by utilizing familiar technology. They should have complete peace of mind that their data truly stays theirs. Second, in a cloud and mobile world there are no real controlled end-points anymore, unless we want to take a step back into the stone ages. And third, the firewall model is broken and trying to extend the perimeter out simply doesn’t work anymore. It’s about protecting the information, wherever it is, and not about locking everything down where it’s hard to access, use and share for your employees and partners.

So he is presenting a new cybersecurity world where the security follows the data, using encryption and other methods.

I think that is something that every organization should consider – especially encryption.

But is it enough?

For a start, how secure is encryption in the face of the sophisticated attacker? Maybe it is reasonably secure now, but we cannot be sure it will remain secure. Consider how encryption was broken by researchers, with the story told in this 2013 article.

I think you need at least three levels of protection: prevention, encryption, and detection, followed by response.

We can no longer assume that the bad guys cannot get in, and I am reluctant to assume that my encryption will not be broken if they have time.

So, we need the ability to detect any intruders promptly – so we can shut them down and limit any damage.

Too few have sufficient detection in place. Just look how long hackers were inside JP Morgan, and then how long it took the company to expel them!

I welcome your views.

Understanding and managing cyber risk

March 29, 2015 8 comments

Last week, I participated in an NACD Master Class. I was a panelist in discussions of technology and cyber risk with 40-50 board members very actively involved – because this is a hot topic for boards.

I developed and shared a list of 12 questions that directors can use when they ask management about their organization’s understanding and management of cyber-related business risk.

The set of questions can also be used by executive management, risk professionals, or internal auditors, or even by information security professionals interested in assessing whether they have all the necessary bases covered.

This is my list.

  1. How do you identify and assess cyber-related risks?
  2. Is your assessment of cyber-related risks integrated with your enterprise-wide risk management program so you can include all the potential effects on the business (including business disruption, reputation risk, inability to bill customers, loss of IP, compliance risk, and so on) and not just “IT-risk”?
  3. How do you evaluate the risk to know whether it is too high?
  4. How do you decide what actions to take and how much resource to allocate?
  5. How often do you update your cyber risk assessment? Do you have sufficient insight into changes in cyber-related risks?
  6. How do you assess the potential new risks introduced by new technology? How do you determine when to take the risk because of the business value?
  7. Are you satisfied that you have an appropriate level of protection in place to minimize the risk of a successful attack?
  8. How will you know when your defenses have been breached? Will you know fast enough to minimize any loss or damage?
  9. Can you respond appropriately at speed?
  10. What procedures are in place to notify you, and then the board, in the event of a breach?
  11. Who has responsibility for cybersecurity and do they have the access they need to senior management?
  12. Is there an appropriate risk-aware culture within the organization, especially given the potential for any manager to introduce new risks by signing up for new cloud services?

I am interested in your comments on the list, how it can be improved, and how useful it is – and to whom.

New information and perspectives on cyber security

March 21, 2015 10 comments

The world continues to buzz about cyber security (or, perhaps we should say, insecurity). Now we have the Chinese government apparently admitting that they have a cyberwarfare capability: not just one unit, but three. Other nations, including the United States, Japan, and some European nations, are talking about their ineffective defenses and the need to develop an offensive capability.

What can the targets, not only any public or private company, but each of us as an individual target (yes, our personal devices are constantly under attack), do about this?

The first step is to get our collective heads out of the sand and understand that we are all, collectively and individually, at risk. The level of successful attacks is enormous (a billion records with personal information were hacked in 2014 according to IBM, as reported here). According to a survey discussed in Fortune, 71% of companies admit they were hacked last year and the majority expects to be hacked this year. However, nearly a quarter, according to Fortune, has not only kept their heads in the sand but do so with unbelievable confidence; they think a successful cyber attack is “not likely” in the next 12 months. The trouble is that very often successful attacks are not detected! It took a long time before JPMorgan Chase found out they had been hacked, and even longer before they knew the extent of damage.

Organizations need to be ready to respond effectively and fast!

The JPMorgan Chase article reports that “The people with knowledge of the investigation said it would take months for the bank to swap out its programs and applications and renegotiate licensing deals with its technology suppliers, possibly giving the hackers time to mine the bank’s systems for unpatched, or undiscovered, vulnerabilities that would allow them re-entry into JPMorgan’s systems.”

All is for naught if successful intrusions are not detected and responses initiated on a timely basis. In the Target case, reports say that the security monitoring service detected suspicious activity but the company did not respond. According to ComputerWeekly.com, many companies make the mistake of “Over-focusing on prevention and not paying enough attention to detection and response. Organisations need to accept that breaches are inevitable and develop and test response plans, differentiating between different types of attacks to highlight the important ones.”

Another insightful article discusses the critical need for pre-planned response capabilities. IT cannot do it all themselves; business executives need to not only be involved but actively work to ensure their operations can survive a successful intrusion.

What else should we do?

We have to stop using passwords like ‘password’, the name of our pet, or our birthday. Password managers are excellent tools (see this article on the top-rated products) and merit serious consideration. I have one (BTW, I don’t plan to replace it with the latest idea from Yahoo of one-time text messages. However, I do like the fingerprint authentication on my iPhone.)

A risk-based approach to cyber security is the right path, in my view. But that does mean that organizations have to continuously monitor new and emerging risks, or new observations about existing risks. An example is a new article on insecure mobile apps – both from in-house developers and from external sources.

Organizations need to allocate resources to cyber and information security commensurate with the risks, and individuals have to take the time to update the software on their personal devices. Internal audit departments should make sure they have the talent to make a difference, providing objective evaluations and business-practical suggestions for improvement.

Companies and individuals, both, need to make sure they apply all the security patches released by software vendors. They address the vulnerabilities most often targeted and when there is a breach, very often it’s because the patches have not been applied.

As individuals, we should have a credit monitoring service (I do), set up alerts for suspicious activity on their bank accounts, and all the anti-virus and spam protection that is reasonable to apply.

Finally, as individuals and as organizations, we need to make sure we and our people are alert to the hackers’ attempts through malware, social engineering, and so on. It is distressing that so many successful intrusions start with somebody clicking where they should not be clicking.

Here are a couple of articles worth reading and a publication by COSO (written by Deloitte) on how their Internal Control Framework can be used to address cyber risks.

Cybersecurity in 2015: What to expect

Cybersecurity Hindsight And A Look Ahead At 2015

COSO in the cyber age

As always, I welcome your comments.

Predictions for GRC, risk management, and compliance

March 7, 2015 4 comments

MetricStream[1] has shared with us a November, 2014 report from the analyst firm, Forrester: Predictions 2015: The Governance, Risk, And Compliance Market Is Ready For Disruption (registration required).

I have had serious issues in the past with Forrester, their understanding and portrayal of risk management and GRC, their assessment of the vendors’ solutions, and the advice they give to organizations considering purchasing software to address their business problems.

However, they do talk to a lot of organizations, both those who buy software as well as those who sell it. So it is worth our time to read their reports and consider what they have to say.

I’m going to work my way through the report, with excerpts and comments as appropriate.

“…the governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) technology market is ripe for disruption”.

I have a problem with the whole notion of a GRC market. For a start, the “G” is silent! The analysts seem to forget that there are processes, each of which can be enabled by technology, to support governance of the organization by the board and others. For example, there is a need to enable the secure, efficient, and useful sharing of information with the board – for scheduled meetings and throughout the year. In addition, there are needs to support whistleblower processes, legal case management, investigations, the setting and cascading of business objectives and goals, the monitoring of performance, and so many more.

In addition, organizations should not be looking for a GRC solution. They should instead be looking for solutions to meet their more critical business needs. Many organizations are purchasing a bundle of GRC capabilities, but only use some of what they have bought – and what they do use may not be the best in the market to address that need.

Finally, I have written before about the need to manage risk to strategies and objectives. Yet, most of these so-called GRC solutions don’t support strategy setting and management. There is no integration of risk and strategy. Executives cannot see, as they review progress against their strategies and objectives, both performance progress and the level of related risks.

“A Corporate Risk Event Will Lead TO Losses Topping $20B”

What is a “risk event”? This is strange language. Why can’t they just talk about an “event” or, better still, a “situation”?

I agree that management of organizations continue to make mistakes – as they have ever since Adam and Eve ate the apple. Some mistakes result in compliance failures, penalties, reputation damage, and huge losses. I also agree that the size of those losses continues.

But what about mistakes in assessing the market and customers’ changing needs, bringing new products and services to market, or price-setting (consider how TurboTax alienated and lost customers)? I have seen several companies fall from leaders in their market to being sold for spare parts (Solectron and then Maxtor).

Management should consider all potential effects of uncertainty on the achievement of objectives.

“Embed risk best practices across the business…Risk management helps enhance strategic decision-making at all organizational levels, and when company success or failure is on the line, formal risk processes are essential.”

The focus on decision-making across the enterprise is absolutely correct. Risk management should not be a separate activity from running the business. Every decision-maker needs to consider risk as he or she makes a decision, so they can take the right amount of the right risk.

“Read and understand your country’s corporate sentencing guidelines.”

This is another excellent point! Unfortunately, the authors didn’t follow through and point out that the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines require that organizations take a risk-based approach to ensuring compliance; those that do will have reduced penalties should there be a compliance failure.

“Build and maintain a culture of compliance.”

Stating the obvious. It is easy to say, not so easy to accomplish.

“Review risks in your current register and add ‘customer impact’ to the relevant ones.”

All the potential consequences of a risk should be included when analyzing it. Rather than ‘customer,’ I would include the issues that derive from upsetting the customer, such as lost sales and market share.

Further, it’s not a matter of reviewing risks in your risk register. It’s about including all potential consequences every time you make a decision, as well as when you conduct a periodic review of risks. Risk management should be an integral part of how decisions are made and the organization is run – not just when the risk register is reviewed.

Forrester makes some comments and predictions concerning GRC vendors. I don’t know whether they are right or wrong.

However, I say again that organizations should not focus on which is the best GRC platform. They should instead look for the best solution to their business needs, whatever it is called.

I do agree with Forrester that there are some excellent tools that can be used for risk monitoring. They should be integrated with the risk management solution, with ways to alert appropriate management when risk levels change.

What do you think of the report, the excerpts, and my comments?

Should we continue to talk about GRC platforms? Is it time to evaluate risk management solutions? How about integrated strategy, performance, and risk solutions?

[1] By way of complete disclosure, I have a relationship with a number of vendors of “GRC” solutions, including MetricStream and Resolver. I no longer have a relationship with SAP.

The risk of an ineffective CIO

February 28, 2015 1 comment

According to McKinsey, “executives’ current perceptions of IT performance are decidedly negative”. An interesting piece, Why CIOs should be business-strategy partners, informs us that the majority of organizations are not benefitting from an effective CIO, one who not only maintains the infrastructure necessary to run the business but also works with senior management to drive new business strategies.

Why worry about the “big” risks on the WEF or Protiviti list when the “small” risks that let your business survive and thrive are huge?

For example, the survey behind the report found that:

  • “..few executives say their IT leaders are closely involved in helping shape the strategic agenda, and confidence in IT’s ability to support growth and other business goals is waning”.
  • “IT and business executives still differ in their understanding of the function’s priorities and budgets. Nearly half of technology respondents see cost cutting as a top priority—in stark contrast to the business side, where respondents say that supporting managerial decision making is one of IT’s top priorities.”
  • “In the 2012 survey on business and tech­nology, 57 percent of executives said IT facilitated their companies’ ability to enter new markets. Now only 35 percent say IT facilitates market entry, and 41 percent report no effect.”

With respect to the effectiveness of traditional IT functional processes, few rated performance as either completely or very effective:

  • Managing IT infrastructure – 43%
  • Governing IT performance – 26%
  • Driving technology enablement or innovation in business processes and operations – 24%
  • Actively managing IT organization’s health and culture (not only its performance) – 22%
  • Introducing new technologies faster and/or more effectively than competitors – 18%

There was a marked difference when the CIO is active. “Where respondents say their CIOs are very or extremely involved in shaping enterprise-wide strategy, they report much higher IT effectiveness than their peers whose CIOs are less involved.” McKinsey goes on to say:

“We know from experience that CIOs with a seat at the strategy table have a better understanding of their businesses’ near- and longer-term technology needs. They are also more effective at driving partnerships and shared accountability with the business side. Unfortunately, CIOs don’t play this role of influential business executive at many organizations. The results show that just over half of all respondents say their CIOs are on their organizations’ most senior teams, and only one-third say their CIOs are very or extremely involved in shaping the overall business strategy and agenda.”

The report closes with some suggestions. I like the first one:

“The survey results suggest that companies would do well to empower and require their CIOs and other technology leaders to play a more meaningful role in shaping business strategy. This means shifting away from a CIO with a supplier mind-set who provides a cost-effective utility and toward IT leadership that is integrated into discussions of overall business strategy and contributes positively to innovating and building the business. Some ways to encourage such changes include modifying reporting lines (so the CIO reports to the CEO, for example, rather than to leaders of other support functions), establishing clear partnerships between the IT and corporate-strategy functions, and holding both business and IT leaders accountable for big business bets.”

Is your CIO effective, both in supplying the infrastructure to run the business and in working in partnership with business leaders to enable strategic progress?

Is this a risk that is understood and being addressed?

I welcome your comments.

Technology, Strategy, Cyber, and Risk

November 8, 2014 2 comments

How do you assess the risk of missing the opportunity to leverage disruptive technology?

Does being on the “bleeding edge” still scare you?

Are you scared of cyber risk that you are rooted in place?

With incredible advances in technology coming at us from all sides, the potential for organizations to offer new products and services, as well as make dramatic improvements in how they run the enterprise, is huge.

Yet, each of these new technologies also introduces new risks that are of concern to information security, risk, and assurance professionals.

I am concerned that organizations are not prepared to survive let alone thrive in this environment.

I want to share some questions for your consideration, but let’s look first at one new technology that is emerging as disruptive to manufacturing and other sectors: additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing. These two sites explain some of the potential:

For most of us, 3-D printing is something from the world of science fiction or TV series. But, it is real and it is now.

Do you think every organization that could be affected by this technology has taken the necessary steps to determine how it should affect their organizational objectives and strategies? Do they even know how it could affect them?

My questions:

  1. Is your organization monitoring new technology and able to identify how it could affect your organization?
  2. Do you know what your competitors may be doing with it?
  3. Do you know what other organizations are doing or planning to do that might turn them into competitors (think Apple and Rolex)?
  4. Are the right people thinking about how the technology could affect your organization?
  5. Do they have the ability to come up with ways to use the technology that are novel and different from others?
  6. When new technology is considered, does your organization have reliable processes to assess related risks?
  7. Is the voice of risk heard – and understood?
  8. Is your organization prepared to take the risks necessary to succeed?
  9. Do you understand the risk of not taking the risk?
  10. Is your organization sufficiently agile to cast old ideas aside and seize the opportunities?
  11. Is your organization willing to wait when the (adverse) risk exceeds the opportunity?
  12. Do your information security, risk management, internal audit, and other assurance providers steer you to take the right risks or are they only a drag, pointing out the negative?

Do you agree with this list? What would you change?

I welcome your comments.

Information Security and Risk

October 24, 2014 4 comments

Should information security (or cyber, if we follow the latest fad) be based on risk? What is that risk, is it risk to the information or other IT resources, or is it risk to the business?

I congratulate John Pironti and Dark Reading for the intelligent perspective in a short video interview.

Two points stand out for me:

  1. The investment in information security/cyber should be based on the risk to the business and the achievement of business objectives.
  2. Information security professionals need to talk to the business in the language of the business – which is risk and performance. That means that the CISO and team need to understand the business objectives and how a failure in cyber might impair the ability to achieve them.

Information security professionals will be able to get and retain the attention of executives when they are able to explain how investments in information security help managers and the business as a whole succeed.

While information security professionals should continue to advance their understanding of technical issues, most need to upgrade their understanding of the business and business risks. Risk management guidance, such as the ISO 31000:2009 global risk management standard, should be required reading in addition to business and technical journals.

I welcome your comments.

Leading the 21st century organization

October 6, 2014 1 comment

I have been a fan of Tom Peters (author of “In Search of Excellence” and many more books) for more than 20 years.

While CAE at Tosco Corporation, I attended a presentation by him on something he called Wow! The concept, which I not only wrote about for the Internal Auditor magazine in 2001 but tried to incorporate into my internal audit practice, is to turn every project into something that you would tell your grandchildren about (Wow! indeed).

Tom is now 71 but hasn’t slowed down. He is amazingly actively presenting all over the world, writing books, and on Twitter (where we interact from time to time).

Recently, he was interviewed by McKinsey and I recommend reading the full piece. Here are some excerpts.

“My real bottom-line hypothesis is that nobody has a sweet clue what they’re doing. Therefore you better be trying stuff at an insanely rapid pace. You want to be screwing around with nearly everything. Relentless experimentation was probably important in the 1970s—now it’s do or die.”

“…the secret to success is daydreaming.”

“If you take a leadership job, you do people. Period. It’s what you do. It’s what you’re paid to do. People, period. Should you have a great strategy? Yes, you should. How do you get a great strategy? By finding the world’s greatest strategist, not by being the world’s greatest strategist. You do people.”

“We’re in the big-change business, aren’t we? Isn’t that the whole point? I mean, any idiot with a high IQ can invent a great strategy. What’s really hard is fighting against the unwashed masses and pulling it off—although there’s nothing stupider than saying change is about overcoming resistance. Change is about recruiting allies and working each other up to have the nerve to try the next experiment. You find allies. You encircle the buggers.”

“I’m more than willing to say that today’s two year old is going to deal with his or her fellow human beings differently than you or I do. But the reality is it’s 2014, not 2034, and I would argue that for the next 20 years, we’re still safe believing in the importance of face-to-face contact. I’m not arguing against virtual meetings, but I’m telling you that if I’m running IBM, I want to be on the road 200 days a year as much in 2014 as in 2004 or in 1974. It has nothing to do with the value of the tools, but I’ve got to see you face to face now and then; I don’t think I can do it all screen to screen.”

“At some deep level, people are people, and so I believe passionately that there is no difference between leading now and leading then. What I certainly believe is that anybody who is leading a sizable institution who doesn’t do what I did and take a year off and read or what have you, and who doesn’t embrace the new technology with youthful joy and glee, is out of business.”

This last is 100% consistent with the quote from another McKinsey Quarterly issue I used in Management for the Next 50 Years:

“Those who understand the depth, breadth, and radical nature of the change and opportunity that’s on the way will be best able to reset their intuitions accordingly, shape this new world, and thrive.”

Do you agree?

Management for the next 50 years

October 3, 2014 3 comments

An article in McKinsey’s Quarterly Journal that I strongly recommend is on the topic of Management intuition for the next 50 years. My only quibble is that title implies that there is time to act; I believe organizations that prepare now for the changes described in the article will thrive immediately and their competitive advantage grow in the next decade let alone 50 years.

I recommend a careful read of the entire piece. Here are some key excerpts to whet your appetite (emphasis added):

“We stand today on the precipice of much bigger shifts…., with extraordinary implications for global leaders. In the years ahead, acceleration in the scope, scale, and economic impact of technology will usher in a new age of artificial intelligence, consumer gadgetry, instant communication, and boundless information while shaking up business in unimaginable ways. At the same time, the shifting locus of economic activity and dynamism, to emerging markets and to cities within those markets, will give rise to a new class of global competitors. Growth in emerging markets will occur in tandem with the rapid aging of the world’s population—first in the West and later in the emerging markets themselves—that in turn will create a massive set of economic strains.”

Any one of these shifts, on its own, would be among the largest economic forces the global economy has ever seen. As they collide, they will produce change so significant that much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant. The formative experiences for many of today’s senior executives came as these forces were starting to gain steam. The world ahead will be less benign, with more discontinuity and volatility and with long-term charts no longer looking like smooth upward curves, long-held assumptions giving way, and seemingly powerful business models becoming upended.”

The article discusses three key trends while acknowledging that there are many more:

  • Dynamism in emerging markets
  • Technology and connectivity
  • Aging populations

This is what it says about technology and connectivity:

“As information flows continue to grow, and new waves of disruptive technology emerge, the old mind-set that technology is primarily a tool for cutting costs and boosting productivity will be replaced. Our new intuition must recognize that businesses can start and gain scale with stunning speed while using little capital, that value is shifting between sectors, that entrepreneurs and start-ups often have new advantages over large established businesses, that the life cycle of companies is shortening, and that decision making has never had to be so rapid fire.”

I think this is very well said! They go on to say:

Emerging on the winning side in this increasingly volatile world will depend on how fully leaders recognize the magnitude—and the permanence—of the coming changes and how quickly they alter long-established intuitions.”

“It will be increasingly difficult for senior leaders to establish or implement effective strategies unless they remake themselves in the image of the technologically advanced, demographically complex, geographically diverse world in which we will all be operating.”

Technology is no longer simply a budget line or operational issue—it is an enabler of virtually every strategy. Executives need to think about how specific technologies are likely to affect every part of the business and be completely fluent about how to use data and technology…… Technological opportunities abound, but so do threats, including cybersecurity risks, which will become the concern of a broader group of executives as digitization touches every aspect of corporate life.”

“New priorities in this environment include ensuring that companies are using machine intelligence in innovative ways to change and reinvent work, building the next-generation skills they need to drive the future’s tech-led business models, and upskilling and retraining workers whose day-to-day activities are amenable to automation but whose institutional knowledge is valuable.”

McKinsey closes with a reiteration of the problem that is also an opportunity for those prepared to take the risk and embrace the need for change:

“Those who understand the depth, breadth, and radical nature of the change and opportunity that’s on the way will be best able to reset their intuitions accordingly, shape this new world, and thrive.”

I welcome your comments.

Dynamic, iterative, and responsive to change

August 23, 2014 4 comments

One of the principles for effective risk management in the ISO 31000:2009 global risk management standard is that risk management should be “dynamic, iterative, and responsive to change”.

I really like that. It captures a number of key ingredients for the effective management of uncertainty and risk.

Dynamic” implies that risk management operates at the speed of the business. It is far more than the occasional, even if regular, assessment of a list of so-called top risks. “Dynamic” is when the consideration and management of risk is part of the fabric of the organization, and an element in daily decision-making and operations of the organization. It is active and essential.

Iterative” is about a reliable set of processes and systems for identifying, assessing, evaluating, and treating risk. It means that when management makes decisions, based in part on risk information, there are proven processes and the information is reliable.

Finally, “responsive to change” is essential when risk changes at speed. Every day there is a potential surprise, a new or changed situation to which the organization should at least consider responding. It could be a shift in exchange rates, a change in the government of a nation where you do business, a flood that affects the supply of a critical component, the decision in a court case that affects you directly (because you are a party) or indirectly (because it creates a new interpretation of a regulation with which you must comply), the loss of a key customer, a new product from a competitor, the loss of a key employee, or so on.

Stuff happens and it changes or creates risk.

The organization must be responsive to change, nimble and agile in modifying strategy and execution.

All of this applies not only to risk management but also to internal audit (and to finance and the rest of the organization, in truth).

Is your internal audit function “dynamic, iterative, and responsive to change“?

For that matter, do IT, Finance, Operations, and so on meet the principle behind that phrase?

Or are they slow, scattered, and stubbornly reluctant to change?

Is that a risk to which we must respond?

I welcome your comments.

Understanding Governance Risks

July 14, 2014 4 comments

How many boards, let alone risk officers, think about the risks to their organization if the governance by the board and top management is ineffective?

Certainly, people talk about the potential for the wrong tone at the top. Frankly, I doubt that members of the board will be able to detect those situations where top executives talk a good game but walk to a different tune; where they put the interests of their pockets ahead of the reputation and long-term success of the organization; where they are prepared to take risks with the organization’s resources without risk to their own..

But governance risks extend well beyond that

Failures to have the time to question and obtain insight in how the organization actually works can leave the enterprise without effective risk management, information security, internal auditing, and more.

Failures to provide the board the information it needs when it needs leaves the directors blind, although they may think they can see.

The governance committee of the board should, in my opinion, consider risks related to governance processes every year. It should engage both the risk and internal audit teams to ensure a quality assessment is performed. Legal counsel should also be actively engaged as issues might have consequences if they are not handled well; for example, any assessment that the board has gaps in director knowledge, experience, or ability to challenge the executive team cannot be communicated outside the firm.

Do you agree? I welcome your comments.

Guidance for Directors on Disruptive Change

July 7, 2014 3 comments

Every organization needs to be able to not only anticipate and address the inevitability of change that might disrupt its business, but be prepared to take advantage of the opportunities that will present themselves.

We talk about risk as if every uncertainty has a downside.

We talk about opportunity as if it is something that we choose to seize or not, and do little to ensure we identify and take full advantage. How do we expect to optimize our performance when we are cavalier about moving quickly to take advantage of opportunities that may rise and disappear quickly?

We talk about resilience as if we should stand tall, like a wall, in the face of disruptive change. Perhaps we should move, either out of the way or to align ourselves to benefit from the movement (think Aikidao).

In fact, all of these come into play. Situations and events can have multiple possible effects, some good and some bad, and are not limited to one outcome at a time. As a simple example, the loss of one employee is the opportunity to hire somebody with different skills, reorganize the function, and so on.

What distinguishes our times from years past is the pace of change.

Deloitte recently published Directors’ Alert 2014: Greater oversight, deeper insight: Boardroom strategies in an era of disruptive change. Here are some excerpts:

“Sometimes, changes occur that are more dramatic. In the past, disruptive changes usually happened only periodically and resulted in a sustained plateau – the automated assembly line, for example, which revolutionized industry in the early twentieth century, continues to be a central feature of modern manufacturing. Today, however, disruptive change has become a perpetual occurrence in which one change instantly sparks a chain of others. What’s more, these changes are being generated by a variety of factors – digital disruption created by continuing technological advances, regulatory reforms, economic turmoil, globalization, and shifting social norms and perceptions.”

“In this environment, everything and anything may change at any time as category boundaries are blurred, supply chains are disrupted, and long-standing business models become obsolete. With change, however, comes opportunity. Technological advances enable organizations to generate new revenues by targeting new customers, new sectors, and access new geographies while more fully automating back office activities and divesting of declining assets to reduce costs. The challenge for organizations is to recognize when disruptive change is occurring and to act quickly and decisively when it does.”

“In this environment of ongoing, tumultuous change, organizations and their management and boards of directors must respond quickly and adeptly if they are to effectively address all the disruptive changes that surround and affect them. For boards of directors, this often requires greater oversight – expanding their scope to include activities and areas that were not traditionally part of their mandate. At the same time, boards must ensure that management provides them with deeper insights into the organization’s activities so directors can clearly understand all of the potential opportunities and risks.”

Deloitte takes each area of major change (such as strategy, technology, taxation, regulatory compliance and so on) and includes questions for directors to use in discussions with management.

I am working with ISACA on guidance for directors and executives on how disruptive technology might affect corporate strategy. I came up with a few questions of my own that directors and top executives might use:

  1. How does the organization identify the new or maturing technologies that might be of value and merit consideration in setting or adjusting strategies, objectives, and plans?
  2. Who is responsible for the assessment process?
  3. Who determines whether existing strategies, objectives, or plans should be adjusted?
  4. Does the assessment consider the potential for value to be created in multiple areas of the organization, or does each functional area act on its own?
  5. Does the assessment consider, with inclusion in the process of related experts, potential compliance and other risks?
  6. Does the assessment consider the potential actions of competitors, suppliers, customers, and regulators?
  7. Does the board discuss the potential represented by new or maturing technology on a regular basis and as part of its discussions of enterprise strategy?

Do you think these are the right questions? How would your organization fare?

I welcome your comments.

New Technology for Internal Auditors from SAP

July 5, 2014 3 comments

My good friends at SAP have shared the good news with me. They’re releasing a new technology solution for internal auditors at the IIA International Conference in London. I only wish I could be there to join the celebration.

As the head of internal audit departments at major global corporations for twenty years, I  always looked for ways to upgrade our effectiveness and efficiency. For example, I used analytics software for data mining (especially when it came to fraud detection) and risk monitoring. However, the technology solutions developed specifically for internal auditors were often not supported by my company’s IT department and were difficult to use against core enterprise financial and other systems. I got around this by hiring proficient programmers (in one company, all they did was develop and run reports for our audit engagements).

I also spent a number of years as an executive in IT and experienced first-hand the problems created when an organization’s technology environment is fragmented, with applications from multiple vendors using different platforms, languages, database systems, and so on. It not only made supporting customer needs tough, especially when they wanted rapid change, but expensive.

What I like most about the new SAP solution is that if the organization already uses SAP systems it won’t have to introduce new technology just to support internal audit. Because SAP audit management is built on the SAP HANA platform, it will be easier to integrate the audit planning with the enterprise’s risk management information and with analytics for data mining, fraud detection, and risk monitoring. Internal auditors will be able to use the same analytics as business managers use to obtain information and run the business.

Furthermore, the new SAP audit management system will allow auditors with a simple internet connection to perform and document the audit wherever they are. I‘m a huge fun of running the business from the palm of your hand  using mobile applications that work easily and in real time with the enterprise systems, whether in the cloud or in company data centers.

I am all for technology that helps extend the value of the investment organizations make in internal auditing. I believe the new technology solutions from SAP are worth a careful look. They’re built on some of the very latest, innovative ideas in technology, such as SAP HANA, and will enable internal auditors to perform their work at speed, upgrading their effectiveness and efficiency.

The days of running internal audit from spreadsheets and using audit data mining techniques developed in the last century should be left behind.

By way of full disclosure, I used to work for SAP and have a continuing relationship with them. However, my thoughts are my own and are not influenced by SAP’s management.

Board Oversight of Cyber-Risks

June 29, 2014 4 comments

Over the last few years, “cyber” has moved from science fiction to business reality. I am not sure why we changed from talking about information security to cyber, but I am told (yet not convinced) that there is a difference.

In any event, boards and top management need to be concerned with cyber-risks because of the potential harm an adverse incident can cause to the organization’s reputation and trust, intellectual property, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations – and the business disruption can be even greater.

But how much should boards get involved? Should we expect directors to ask for and inquire about details, or should they instead ask probing questions and satisfy themselves that management has appropriate mechanisms in place?

Cyber Risk Oversight, a publication of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD), in collaboration with AIG and the Internet Security Alliance, takes the position that directors should ask questions. (The executive summary is free, but the detailed questions are in appendices that are only free to members).

I like their five principles, especially the first two:

  1. Directors need to understand and approach cybersecurity as an enterprise-wide risk management issue, not just an IT issue.
  2. Directors should understand the legal implications of cyber risks as they relate to their company’s specific circumstances.
  3. Boards should have adequate access to cybersecurity expertise, and discussions about cyber-risk management should be given regular and adequate time on the board meeting agenda.
  4. Directors should set the expectation that management will establish an enterprise-wide cyber-risk management framework with adequate staffing and budget.
  5. Board-management discussion of cyber risk should include identification of which risks to avoid, accept, mitigate, or transfer through insurance, as well as specific plans associated with each approach.

While some would like to see information security (a.k.a. cybersecurity) as an issue that merits attention all by itself, the potential effect on the entire business and its ability to achieve its objectives justifies cyber being recognized as a business and not “just” an IT issue.

In fact, the level of risk associated with any cybersecurity failure should be measured like any risk, in terms of its effect on the achievement of enterprise objectives. This means that the interrelationship between cyber and revenue generation, customer satisfaction, and so on all need to be considered.

In addition, the investment the organization makes in cybersecurity should be commensurate with the level of risk and balanced against competing needs for capital from other aspects of the business.

Should there be an IT committee of the board? Should the board have several cyber experts who can understand and provide effective oversight? I think the answer is “it depends” – on the level of risk that cyber represents to the organization and whether the board can use the services of experts (such as within risk management and/or internal audit) to fill any knowledge gaps.

I agree with the NACD that the board should ensure it has sufficient information and expertise to ask the right questions of management at regularly scheduled board meetings. I believe they should demand both internal audit and risk management assistance in assessing cyber-risk and the adequacy of management’s programs for managing it.

Do you agree?

 

Related articles

How Good is your GRC? My book now available in paperback and soft copy

June 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Background

Anyone who has been reading my posts should know that I have concerns about the way people are misusing the term GRC. In my April post, I closed with:

So here’s my recommendation to all: stop talking about GRC and start talking the language of the business. Let’s talk about how we can increase value to stakeholders, address potential obstacles and seize opportunities to excel, act with integrity and remain in compliance with current and anticipated regulations, and manage the organization to success.

So how do we move forward?

It is important to get each part of the business working well. But it is also important that they work together. We don’t want fragmented operations that operate in silos.

How can an organization’s board, executives, or internal auditors determine whether their different activities (such as strategy, performance, and risk management) are working together, in harmony, for the optimization of performance while acting with integrity?

 

The Book

I have a new e-book, How Good is your GRC? Twelve Questions to Guide Executives, Boards, and Practitioners. It consolidates my thinking about what GRC means and the business problem it represents (the failure to have the various pieces work together in harmony). I include twelve questions, with discussion, that you can use within your organization in a discussion or assessment process.

 

How and Where is it Available?

If you want a soft copy to read on your PC, tablet, or eReader, a Kindle version is available from Amazon. If you want to read it on your PC, first download the free Kindle for PC app; for the iPad or iPhone, download the free Kindle app from the Apple App Store; and for an Android device, there is a free app on Google Play. Then go to Amazon to purchase the ebook.

A paperback version is now available from Amazon or (my preference) the CreatesSpace e-store.